Paleo-Indian Science Cafe in Albany, New York

From the NYSM:

Coming in to the Country: The First New Yorkers and the Ice Age Landscapes of New York

Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 6:00-7:00 PM

@ The Hollow Bar + Kitchen

New Yorkers today live, work and travel in a built environment, superimposed on the region’s natural landscapes. The first New Yorkers – Native Americans – knew no such cultural conveniences when they colonized the region in the late Ice Age. NYSM curator of archaeology, Dr. Jonathan Lothrop, reviews recent archaeological evidence for when and by what routes Native Americans may have colonized the region, and in turn, how these Paleoindian peoples may have used and traversed these subarctic landscapes to survive in late Pleistocene New York.

This fun, interactive program is free. Food and drink are not included.

The Hollow Bar + Kitchen is located at 79 North Pearl Street. Albany, NY 12207.

For more information, please call (518) 474-0575 or visit www.nysm.nysed.gov

History Program at the New York State Museum

Upcoming Great Places and Spaces history event in Albany this Saturday. From the press release:

Representatives from state historic sites and cultural institutions will provide educational hands-on activities, unique artifacts to explore, and information about upcoming events during the annual “New York State’s Great Places and Spaces” program on Saturday, January 14 from noon to 4:00 p.m. at the New York State Museum. 

Visitors can learn about New York State history through activities and information provided by over 20 state historic sites, museums, and libraries. In addition, The Iron Jacks, a singing group that specializes in songs about U.S. sailors of the Civil War era, will perform at noon and 2:00 p.m. There will also be a guided tour of the Hudson Valley Ruins exhibition at 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. and a “hands-on” cart of Native Peoples reproduction objects where visitors can get first-hand experience with materials used by the Iroquois in the past and present.

Participating institutions include the Adirondack Museum, Albany Institute of History & Art, Albany Pine Bush, Burden Iron Works, Civil War Round Table, Crailo State Historic Site, Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum, Historic Cherry Hill, Guilderland Historical Society, Johnson Hall State Historic Site, Knox’s Headquarters State Historic Sites, New Windsor Cantonment, NYS Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation, Olana State Historic Site, Saratoga National Historical Park, Saratoga Racing & Hall of Fame, Schenectady Historical Society, Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, U.S. Grant Cottage Historic Site, and U.S. Naval Landing Party.

Admission is free. Further information about programs and events can be obtained by calling (518) 474-5877 or visiting the Museum website at www.nysm.nysed.gov.

Indian Motorcycles at the American Swedish Museum

Why does the American Swedish Historical Museum have an exhibit on Indian motorcycles? Because one of the founders of the Indian Motorcycle Company, Carl Oscar Hedstrom, was an immigrant from Sweden. The museum, located in Philadelphia, has several motorcycles and other artifacts on display. While there, you can also pick up some herring and lingonberry preserves at the gift shop.

Indian Nation at the American Swedish Historical Museum
Carl Oscar Hedstrom in 1901. Source: public domain, wikimedia.org

Best. Publicity Stunt. Ever. (Holy Grail category)

Visitors swamped the museum at the San Isidro Basilica in Spain after two authors published a book claiming a goblet at the basilica is the Holy Grail. It’s not clear yet if the basilica was informed of the stunt prior to publication of the book, or if they were able to raise (or start charging) admission rates before the crowds arrived. Probably not, since they were unable to cope with the demand to see the goblet and have temporarily taken it off display.

Take your pick of news reports covering the story, like this one at the Guardian.

If you need to see The Holy Grail and can’t make it to San Isidro, you can visit the Cloisters Museum in New York City and view another The Holy Grail, a.k.a. the Antioch Chalice, which is either the real Grail, or maybe a lamp. The provenience of that one seems a bit sketchy, too.

The Antioch chalice. Source: Wmpearl via wikimedia commons.